You must be of legal drinking age in your country to enter this site.
Please enter your date of birth below and press "Enter".

Are you years or older?

We support the Century Council's fight against underage drinking and drunk driving. To learn more, visit their website.
Please enjoy our wines responsibly. © 2019 Ruffino Import Company, Rutherford, CA
By using this website, you agree to the Privacy Policy and Terms & Conditions of use.

You must be of legal drinking age in your country to enter this site. Please select your country and press "Next".

Select your country

We support the Century Council’s fight against underage drinking and drunk driving. To learn more, visit their website.
Please enjoy our wines responsibly. © 2019 Ruffino Import Company, Rutherford, CA

Italy & Wine
Regions, Classifications & Varietals

Italy & Wine

Italy & Wine

This one small country contains an overwhelming diversity of natural features—an immense coastline, three major mountain ranges, foothills, and relatively little flat land.

Hover over the map or use the key to see our Italy wine regions and estates. Explore which wines are produced here and where our estates are located.

Valdobbiadene

Delle Venezie

Friuli

Orvieto

Orvieto Classico

Montepulciano

Montalcino

Chianti

Chianti Classico

Piedmont

Valdobbiadene
Delle Venezie
Friuli
Orvieto
Orvieto Classico
Montepulciano
Montalcino
Chianti
Chianti Classico
Piedmont

Valdobbiadene:

Prosecco

Delle Venezie:

Lumina Pinot Grigio

Friuli:

Il Ducale Pinot Grigio

Orvieto:

Orvieto Classico

Orvieto Classico:

Orvieto Classico

Montepulciano:

Lodola Nuova Greppone Mazzi

Montalcino:

Greppone Mazzi

Chianti:

Chianti DOCG Poggio Casciano

Chianti Classico:

Riserva Ducale, Riserva Ducale Oro, Santedame Gretole

Piedmont:

Moscato d'Asti
Italian Wine Varietals

Sangiovese

Tuscany's #1 red grape, and the primary grape used to produce Chianti wines Means 'Blood of Jupiter' Characteristics: Medium color intensity, high acidity, firm tannins Aromas & Flavors: Cherries, plums, berries, herbs, flowers, chocolate, smoke

Explore Wines
Italian Wine Varietals

Sangiovese Grosso

Means 'Large Sangiovese' Top-quality Sangiovese clone Known as Brunello in Montalcino Characteristics: Silky, dry, medium bodied Aromas & Flavors: Cherries, blackberries, pepper, earth

Explore Wines
Italian Wine Varietals

Canaiolo

Traditionally blended with Sangiovese in order to soften intensity and texture Characteristics: Less tannin, less acidity than Sangiovese; by itself, produces light reds and ros´s Aromas & Flavors: Slightly bitter, berry and vegetal undertones

Explore Wines
Italian Wine Varietals

Canaiolo Bianco

Also called Drupeggio Mostly planted in Umbria where it is an important blending variety in Orvieto wines Characteristics: Soft with a touch of sweetness Aromas & Flavors: Apple, pear, citrus

Explore Wines
Italian Wine Varietals

Cabernet Sauvignon

Frequently blended with Sangiovese in order to balance tannins Characteristics: Dark color, firm tannins Aromas & Flavors: Black currants, cedar, tobacco, occasional vegetal undertones

Explore Wines
Italian Wine Varietals

Chardonnay

The principal white grape variety of Burgundy, France; grown in Tuscany for more than 150 years Characteristics: Lean, crisp Aromas & Flavors: Citrus fruits, creamy vanilla, caramel, honey, peaches

Explore Wines
Italian Wine Varietals

Colorino

Known for its intensely dark skins, which impart deep color to wines Little-known indigenous variety containing powerful antioxidants Characteristics: Highly colored, dry Aromas & Flavors: Black cherries, cassis, vanilla, chocolate

Explore Wines
Italian Wine Varietals

Glera

The heart of Prosecco wines Mostly planted in Italy's northeastern Veneto region Characteristics: Subtle fruit character and light, refreshing acidity Aromas & Flavors: Fresh apple, white peach, pears, stone fruits and florals

Explore Wines
Italian Wine Varietals

Grechetto

The most typical white variety used in Orvieto Classico DOC wines Primarily a blending grape, although some varietal wines can be found Characteristics: Provides structure, fruit and balance Aromas & Flavors: Floral and nutty flavors

Explore Wines
Italian Wine Varietals

Merlot

Often blended with Sangiovese in order to provide color and fleshiness Characteristics: Medium body and color Aromas & Flavors: Black currants, cherries, herbs, vegetal undertones

Explore Wines
Italian Wine Varietals

Moscato Bianco

Thought to be the oldest domesticated grape varietal The primary grape used in Moscato d'Asti wines Characteristics: Light bodied, aromatic Aromas & Flavors: Peach, citrus and floral notes

Explore Wines
Italian Wine Varietals

Pinot Grigio

'Grigio' means 'gray' in Italian-the fruit is commonly grayish blue A popular grape variety in northeastern Italy Characteristics: Light bodied and acidic Aromas & Flavors: Tropical fruit notes of melon and mango

Explore Wines
Italian Wine Varietals

Procanico

A specific clone of Trebbiano Toscano Primarily a blending grape Characteristics: Fresh and fruity with high acid Aromas & Flavors: Citrus and almonds

Explore Wines
Sangiovese

ITALIAN WINE CLASSIFICATIONS: IGT, DOC AND DOCG

All Italian wines are assigned to one of four government-regulated classifications. The three regulated categories become increasingly strict, with IGT being the most lenient to give winemakers flexibility, and DOCG being the most controlled. The fourth category, table wine, is unregulated. Ruffino makes no wine in this unregulated category.

ITALIAN WINE CLASSIFICATIONS: IGT, DOC AND DOCG

IGT

Typical geographical place

The IGT classification includes wines that are typical to a large geographic area (for example, Tuscany) by way of color, grape varieties and/or wine type. Growers must apply for IGT status and wine labels must declare a specific region. IGT wines are subject to some production limitations, but no taste or quality tests are required.

DOC

Controlled (or protected) place of origin

The DOC classification includes wines from specified grape varieties in officially designated and registered geographic areas. Producers in each region determine the regulations, which cover every phase of grape-growing and winemaking including origin of the fruit, grape varieties, production methods, wine color, aromas and flavors. The government oversees the regulations, but no taste or quality tests are required.

DOCG

Controlled and guaranteed place of origin

The DOCG classification is the most stringent. It requires producers to control and guarantee everything that is claimed on the wine label. Sample lots must be approved by a tasting panel of experts. DOCG wines are also subject to legal analysis at any time.